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An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


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  #11  
Old August 25, 2008, 12:07 PM
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JAJAJAJAJAJAJAJAJA, It's very vulgar but, it's truth too.

My father the say it now, and I had said it too.

It's the truth when we are grown age shouldn't have Pelos en la lengua. jijijijij
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  #12  
Old August 27, 2008, 09:23 PM
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Very good! As far as pelos goes........

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Old August 27, 2008, 11:07 PM
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Do the Spaniards use "jaja" for laughing, like the Englishmen are using "haha"?
I guess it's because of the "ch"-sound, the jay's have, right?

I had never thought about it before, but after I've learned (a bit) Spanish, I realized, that must be the reason. The funny thing is that in Danish "ja" means "yes", and if it's said repeatedly, like "jaja", or more times, it's seen as somewhat offensive. If you say it, it indicates that you already know what a speaker is telling you, and just try to shut him up; like, "yeah, I already know that, tell me something I don't."
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  #14  
Old August 28, 2008, 12:02 AM
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Yes, jajaja and jijiji are the Spanish equivalents for 'ha! ha! ha!' and 'hee! hee! hee!' in English (your choice of punctuation and repetitions). They are pronounced nearly the same, except that the Spanish 'j' is more aspirated than the English 'h'.
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Old August 28, 2008, 01:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Yes, jajaja and jijiji are the Spanish equivalents for 'ha! ha! ha!' and 'hee! hee! hee!' in English (your choice of punctuation and repetitions). They are pronounced nearly the same, except that the Spanish 'j' is more aspirated than the English 'h'.
The Js being more aspirated as you say here, is one reason many Spaniards have a heavy accent when speaking English. House, he , her , here and many other common words starting with an h sound like jouse, je, jer, jere...(not phonetic transcriptions)
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Old August 28, 2008, 06:08 AM
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I guess Spaniards would be good German-speakers, when it comes to the German "ch," like in "Buch."
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Old August 28, 2008, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by ElDanés View Post
I guess Spaniards would be good German-speakers, when it comes to the German "ch," like in "Buch."
Depending on where in Germany or Austria... you live, you would pronounce that as a Spanish J or a Spanish ch, although none of them is exactly the same.
Having said this, I have to admit I'm very good at pronouncing German, but my conversation abilities are practically nil.
P. S. What smilie could we use for a show-off, David?
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Old August 28, 2008, 06:35 AM
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The gutteral j in Spanish may help some Spanish speakers pronounce German, but there are other problems which include the germanic tendency to end words with consonents which is much less common
in Spanish. Also, as in English, many words in German start with s. This is
truly foreign in Spanish and hard for most Spanish speakers to learn.
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Old August 28, 2008, 06:55 AM
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The gutteral j in Spanish may help some Spanish speakers pronounce German, but there are other problems which include the germanic tendency to end words with consonents which is much less common
in Spanish. Also, as in English, many words in German start with s. This is
truly foreign in Spanish and hard for most Spanish speakers to learn.
True.
My students tend to pronounce estudent, Espain...when speaking English.And it's also difficult for a Spaniard to reproduce the sh sound in shop, shadow... Some of them, have near-native pronunciations though, usually the young ones who have travelled abroad.
What I mean is, if you master those two sounds you can pronounce Student, Spanien... quite easily.
The vocab and grammar are a different story, though.
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Old August 28, 2008, 09:41 PM
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Originally Posted by María José View Post
P. S. What smilie could we use for a show-off, David?
Hmmm, I don't know. If you have any ideas, let me know.
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