#11  
Old April 28, 2008, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Alfonso View Post
Yes, I'm an optimist drunker .
Please say it this way, I'm an optimistic drinker.
Does beber de vaso en vaso mean nonstop drinking?

In English we use chain smoker for a person who who habitually smokes a cigarette and then lights up another right away, but we don't have an equivalent term form drinking. Chain drinking doesn't work.
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  #12  
Old April 28, 2008, 09:57 AM
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Another way to say beber de vaso en vaso is 'to drink glass after glass.'
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  #13  
Old April 28, 2008, 12:56 PM
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Thanks for the input on if it's a glass or a bottle that's half full / half empty. This reminds me that linguistically, we each have what is called an ideolect, our own personal version of the language we speak.

An example of ideolect is for me personally is the following

I don't know whether to go on vacation.
I don't know whether to go on vacation or not.


For me personally, the first one is wrong, and the second is the only right way to say it. But there are native English speakers who will disagree with me.

-----------

In regards to the terms drunker, drunkard and drinker.

drunker is the comparative:
I'm drunker than she is.
Estoy más emborrachado que ella.

drunkard = borracho (you can also use drunk)
He's a drunkard.
He's a drunk.
El es borracho.

drinker refers to someone who drinks (usually speaking of alcoholic beverages) This does not imply that the person is a drunk or drunkard.
She's a social drinker.
He's a light drinker.
Alfonso's an optimistic drinker.
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  #14  
Old April 28, 2008, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Tomisimo View Post
Thanks for the input on if it's a glass or a bottle that's half full / half empty. This reminds me that linguistically, we each have what is called an ideolect, our own personal version of the language we speak.

An example of ideolect is for me personally is the following

I don't know whether to go on vacation.
I don't know whether to go on vacation or not. you can certainly say. "I don't know whether or not to go on vacation"-- it's more gramatically correct because it doesn't split the preposition.



For me personally, the first one is wrong, and the second is the only right way to say it. But there are native English speakers who will disagree with me.

-----------

In regards to the terms drunker, drunkard and drinker.

drunker is the comparative:
I'm drunker than she is.
Estoy más emborrachado que ella.

drunkard = borracho (you can also use drunk)
He's a drunkard.
He's a drunk.
El es borracho.

drinker refers to someone who drinks (usually speaking of alcoholic beverages) This does not imply that the person is a drunk or drunkard.
She's a social drinker.
He's a light drinker.
Alfonso's an optimistic drinker.
All these details can turn him into a pessimistic drinker.
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  #15  
Old April 28, 2008, 02:17 PM
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For me:
I don't know whether to go on vacation.
I don't know whether or not to go on vacation.
I don't know whether to go on vacation or not.


The point being we each have an ideolect, and there are many native English speakers who regularly use the first one.
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  #16  
Old April 28, 2008, 04:53 PM
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Grrrbbss... I only needed to drink a pair... to get to the end... of the thread... I got it, but I'm still optimistic... I need some mor...
I guess my idiolect is changing from bottle to bottle.
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  #17  
Old April 29, 2008, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Alfonso View Post
Grrrbbss... I only needed to drink a pairUSE TWO INSTEAD OF A PAIR. YOU MAY THINK IT'S A STYLISTIC DIFFERENCE BUT IT'S NOT. EVEN THOUGH A PAIR MEANS TWO, I HAVE NEVER HEARD IT USED IN THIS MANNER ... to get to the end... of the thread... I got it, butAND I'm still optimistic... I need some mor...
I guess my idiolect is changing from bottle to bottle.
Sigues cambiando botella a botella y terminarás una caja de Don Simón sentado solo en el la calle analizando los usos de:
pair,pare,pear , for, of, in, on, at, by ...
Es agradable estar chistoso en otros idiomas.

Poli

Last edited by poli; April 29, 2008 at 11:43 AM.
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  #18  
Old April 29, 2008, 11:00 AM
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Parece que nunca nos podemos quedar en tema.

The thread started with Vaso = Glass
and now we're talking about prepositions........

Elaina
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Old April 29, 2008, 01:10 PM
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Hey, can I not drink a pair of bottles? I have to drink two bottles?
What's the point on that?

Any optimistic drinker can help me?
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  #20  
Old April 29, 2008, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Alfonso View Post
Hey,(THERE'S A STYLISTIC CLASH HERE. "HEY" IS INFORMAL AND "CAN ID NOT" IS VERY FORMAL) WHY can'T I not drink a pair of bottles? DO I have to drink two bottles?
What's the point on(OF) that?

CAN Any optimistic drinker can help me?
Oye Alfonso,

Me parece que par y pair son iguales. Un par de zapatos Un par de guantes Un par de gemelos medias botellas
¿Se dice un par de pantalones? Nosotros decimos a pair of pants.

Otra pregunta: ¿una pareja se puede referirles como un par?
Ejemplo: ¡Manolo y Manuela que par! sé que se puede decir pareja.

Poli
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