#21  
Old June 24, 2009, 06:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
Hola Irmamar

Los niños aquí dicen, "ain't ain't a word and I ain't gunna say it."

Ain't y 'cause son jargon/slang/argot.

A veces ellos los usamos cuando estan hablamos.
Very often we shorten words to make them easier to say:
I am ...... I'm
I am not ..... I'm not
He is .... He's
He is not .... he's not... or .......he isn't
We are ...... we're
We are not .... we aren't

These are correct language usage

However, in parts of Yorkshire you hear people say:

I aren't going, which is as bad as ain't
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  #22  
Old June 24, 2009, 12:44 PM
Arielle Arielle is offline
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I certainly agree with you, irmamar. Even if you don't plan on ever using these expressions, it's important to know their meanings if you want a full understanding of the language! Brute posted a good start for a guide, though.
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  #23  
Old June 25, 2009, 12:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
I don't want to use them either. But I think it's necessary to know them, because when you are listening a conversation, you're able to understand what they're saying. Or, for example, when you're listening a song, these words are often used.
Yes. They are mainly used into of the songs, when I'm to listening some to music in English, always I will find those colloquials words 'bout, etc.

Although I don't grasp understand. Why are they used a lot of?

For instance, this word 'bout if you can see the different is not much only the word is without the A, I can't see the different of don't use the A. Can you see the different? Is more comfortable use them so?

I don't understand. Because some people says does not use them much, without not you must the correct word in all word you write in some place.

Either I can't watch much if they are more common than others one.

In the schools they aren't taught.

My brother said me time before, I remind it ( Luis. You must use always the correct word in English, because they have some different between them, if you need to use abbreviations should to be more explicit, because within to U.S.A the people speaks with a lot of idioms and the words are written incomplete)

Oh I can remember it. It's as a movie in my mind or brain that is repeat each time.

Therefore I set a debate in this post. Why hell are used much them in the songs?


Perhaps I'm a bit imp but I'm sorry just I need to expressing me.


Also I'm sorry for the word Hell ok.
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  #24  
Old June 25, 2009, 01:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrOtALiTo View Post
Yes. They are mainly used into of the songs, when I'm to listening some to music in English, always I will find those colloquials words 'bout, etc.

Although I don't grasp understand. Why are they used a lot of?

For instance, this word 'bout if you can see the different is not much only the word is without the A, I can't see the different of don't use the A. Can you see the different? Is more comfortable use them so?

I don't understand. Because some people says does not use them much, without not you must the correct word in all word you write in some place.

Either I can't watch much if they are more common than others one.

In the schools they aren't taught.

My brother said me time before, I remind it ( Luis. You must use always the correct word in English, because they have some different between them, if you need to use abbreviations should to be more explicit, because within to U.S.A the people speaks with a lot of idioms and the words are written incomplete)

Oh I can remember it. It's as a movie in my mind or brain that is repeat each time.

Therefore I set a debate in this post. Why hell are used much them in the songs?


Perhaps I'm a bit imp but I'm sorry just I need to expressing me.


Also I'm sorry for the word Hell ok.
Solamente ahora me doy cuenta de que usamos esas palabras muy mucho en las canciones, pero no como mucho cuando se está hablando. No sé el razón por eso ( I don't know the reason)
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  #25  
Old June 25, 2009, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
Solamente ahora me doy cuenta de que usamos esas palabras muy mucho en las canciones, pero no como mucho cuando se está hablando. No sé el razón por eso ( I don't know the reason)
"No sé la razón (femenino) o el motivo"

Casi siempre las he visto en canciones.
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  #26  
Old June 25, 2009, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
"No sé la razón (femenino) o el motivo"

Casi siempre las he visto en canciones.
Gracias

Es raro
¡Escoge cualquiera canción y probablemente serás esas palabras!
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  #27  
Old June 25, 2009, 04:25 PM
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Most English words are a single syllable, which works very well in songs - one note for each word of the song. Sometimes, the meter of the song just won't abide a two-syllable word so, for the song's sake, we abbreviate and blend words into a single syllable. That's why "ain't" is so popular in songs; it's a single-syllable word that means a number of different phrases that would normally take three notes to sing!

For example:
I ain't got no ... (sung in 4 notes, but it is non-standard English)
I don't have any ... (proper English requires one more note to sing the same thing)
I do not have any ... (singing it this way requires yet another note)
I haven't got any ... (ditto)

So, songwriters choose the non-standard English phrase in order to fit the meter of the song. This is known as 'poetic license'. UNFORTUNATELY, the non-standard phrase is quickly embraced and before we know it, it's accepted as everyday English. Grammarians have died many times over in the last 4 decades alone!

We Americans love to shorten our words, and we blend them together, if possible, to make even less work for our tongues. Colloquial speech is MUCH different than what is taught in the textbooks. I've noticed this happens in all languages, though, so we've no need to feel like we're alone.

Last edited by Rusty; June 25, 2009 at 04:29 PM.
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  #28  
Old June 25, 2009, 05:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Most English words are a single syllable, which works very well in songs - one note for each word of the song. Sometimes, the meter of the song just won't abide a two-syllable word so, for the song's sake, we abbreviate and blend words into a single syllable. That's why "ain't" is so popular in songs; it's a single-syllable word that means a number of different phrases that would normally take three notes to sing!

For example:
I ain't got no ... (sung in 4 notes, but it is non-standard English)
I don't have any ... (proper English requires one more note to sing the same thing)
I do not have any ... (singing it this way requires yet another note)
I haven't got any ... (ditto)

So, songwriters choose the non-standard English phrase in order to fit the meter of the song. This is known as 'poetic license'. UNFORTUNATELY, the non-standard phrase is quickly embraced and before we know it, it's accepted as everyday English. Grammarians have died many times over in the last 4 decades alone!

We Americans love to shorten our words, and we blend them together, if possible, to make even less work for our tongues. Colloquial speech is MUCH different than what is taught in the textbooks. I've noticed this happens in all languages, though, so we've no need to feel like we're alone.
¡Una respuesta interesante! gracias
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  #29  
Old June 25, 2009, 09:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Most English words are a single syllable, which works very well in songs - one note for each word of the song. Sometimes, the meter of the song just won't abide a two-syllable word so, for the song's sake, we abbreviate and blend words into a single syllable. That's why "ain't" is so popular in songs; it's a single-syllable word that means a number of different phrases that would normally take three notes to sing!

For example:
I ain't got no ... (sung in 4 notes, but it is non-standard English)
I don't have any ... (proper English requires one more note to sing the same thing)
I do not have any ... (singing it this way requires yet another note)
I haven't got any ... (ditto)

So, songwriters choose the non-standard English phrase in order to fit the meter of the song. This is known as 'poetic license'. UNFORTUNATELY, the non-standard phrase is quickly embraced and before we know it, it's accepted as everyday English. Grammarians have died many times over in the last 4 decades alone!

We Americans love to shorten our words, and we blend them together, if possible, to make even less work for our tongues. Colloquial speech is MUCH different than what is taught in the textbooks. I've noticed this happens in all languages, though, so we've no need to feel like we're alone.



I supposed it before.

It's the answer more normal and clear that I have heart.
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