Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Translations


¿Cómo estamos?

 

If you need help translating a sentence or longer piece of text, use this forum. For translations or definitions of a single word or idiom, use the vocabulary forum.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old July 21, 2011, 09:07 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 11,338
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
"Nurses ask their patients that all the time."
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #12  
Old July 21, 2011, 09:30 AM
Luna Azul Luna Azul is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 792
Luna Azul is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
"ask that to their patients" sounds natural to me
ask their patients that sounds even better
Thank you!. So, my sentence, except for the typo was correct?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
"Nurses ask their patients that all the time."
Yes.. that sounds better to me too. Thanks a lot!
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old July 22, 2011, 02:16 AM
Perikles's Avatar
Perikles Perikles is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tenerife
Posts: 4,814
Native Language: Inglés
Perikles is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
"ask that to their patients" sounds natural to me
ask their patients that sounds even better
To me, the first one sounds completely wrong, and the second is the only possibility. I can't think of an English construction where you would 'ask to' somebody, because with 'ask' you have a direct object, not an indirect one.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old July 22, 2011, 05:29 AM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,830
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
In everyday American English you hear it. Other examples:
"How are you today?"
"People ask that all the time."
"Really? They don't ask that to me." (although people don't ask me that
sounds much better) I'm not sure the former would be considered correct in prescriptive grammar, although no rules that I'm running through my head indicate that it is wrong.
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old July 22, 2011, 10:07 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 11,338
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
The verb 'ask' can take both a direct object and an indirect object.

In this article, "I need to ask John a question" is treated as a special case, where the indirect object immediately follows the verb 'ask'. I admit this sounds much better. However, I'm quite certain I've heard the next sentence the article spotlights both ways. And, "He promised it to me," sounds much better than "He promised me it."
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old July 22, 2011, 10:41 AM
Caballero's Avatar
Caballero Caballero is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 505
Caballero is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
In everyday American English you hear it.
I've never once heard it before now. In my idiolect, it is wrong.
__________________
Corrections are welcome.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old July 22, 2011, 11:29 AM
aleCcowaN's Avatar
aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 3,127
Native Language: Castellano
aleCcowaN is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
"ask that to their patients" sounds natural to me
ask their patients that sounds even better
Examples in COCA:

Alan Colmes (FOX news): "In all fairness, you could ask that to anybody in any state about their senator or Congress person, and they probably wouldn't be able to answer that question."

Mrs W. Miller (wife of convicted rapists and murderer Wesley Miller): "You can ask that to my attorneys."

Senator Joseph Biden (in CBS Morning): "And ask that to Phil Gramm."

But "ask to ZZ that" gathers fifty times more instances within that corpus.
__________________
[gone]
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old July 22, 2011, 11:38 AM
Perikles's Avatar
Perikles Perikles is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tenerife
Posts: 4,814
Native Language: Inglés
Perikles is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
The verb 'ask' can take both a direct object and an indirect object.

In this article, "I need to ask John a question" is treated as a special case, where the indirect object immediately follows the verb 'ask'.
Well, I read what it says, but I don't see the person being asked as an indirect object. Clearly, he/she is an indirect object in Romance languages (as far as I can tell) but definitely is a direct object in German (ich frage dich), and also Greek (erotao, eresthai) and Latin (interrogo), where verbs can have two direct objects in the accusative. Ultimately though, I don't suppose it matters how you actually define it in English.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old July 22, 2011, 11:44 AM
Perikles's Avatar
Perikles Perikles is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tenerife
Posts: 4,814
Native Language: Inglés
Perikles is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by aleCcowaN View Post
Examples in COCA:

But "ask to ZZ that" gathers fifty times more instances within that corpus.
(cross-posting) That's interesting because the BNC has zero instances. (I couldn't get access to COCA to compare). "To ask to" is absolutely incorrect in BrE.

I reckon this is some distortion of English caused by the influence of Spanish in America.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old July 22, 2011, 11:55 AM
aleCcowaN's Avatar
aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 3,127
Native Language: Castellano
aleCcowaN is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
I reckon this is some distortion of English caused by the influence of Spanish in America.
You took the words right out of my mouth. I was going to say that I expect English to have a more flexible word order in the future owing to the influence of Spanish.

If you look for people who don't give a darn about word order in English .... servidor, como decimos por acá .
__________________
[gone]
Reply With Quote
Reply

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
¿A cómo son? / ¿a cómo están? poli Translations 11 July 20, 2011 05:45 PM
¿Cómo era?/¿Cómo fue? (ser/ir) gramatica Grammar 2 April 28, 2010 10:40 AM
Parece como tonto pero sin el como ROBINDESBOIS Idioms & Sayings 11 July 20, 2009 06:03 PM
Estamos en el ecuador del curso ROBINDESBOIS Translations 19 July 15, 2009 03:18 PM
Estamos apañados poli Idioms & Sayings 9 March 10, 2009 01:39 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:37 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X