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Old June 10, 2010, 11:26 AM
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A word not much used?

Without looking up, not yet anyway, can you tell what "svelteness" means?

In 30 years of being in the US, I haven't heard or read this word before, at least not that I remember. If I ever did hear or read it, probably I didn't pay attention as it is/was used much in Spanish.

"Like most anti-malware suites, Symantec's NIS intercepts and scans all e-mails as they stream in. NIS has never earned praise for its speed or svelteness."
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Old June 10, 2010, 11:34 AM
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sceltness means trimness. A person who is svelt doesn't have any
michelines
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Old June 10, 2010, 11:44 AM
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Right - "trimness", "slimness", "slenderness" - there's a second definition:
"Refined through wide social experience, smooth, worldly.".
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Old June 10, 2010, 12:31 PM
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I when I was a kid I always thought svelte was a New -York word borrowed from Yiddish or German or Polish. I felt the same way about tumult, but it turns out that it too is proper English even though it sounds
Eastern European to me.

A propósito acabé de verificar en el diccionario que existe una palabra esbelto en español que significa svelte.
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Old June 10, 2010, 01:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
I when I was a kid I always thought svelte was a New -York word borrowed from Yiddish or German or Polish. I felt the same way about tumult, but it turns out that it too is proper English even though it sounds
Eastern European to me.

A propósito acabé de verificar en el diccionario que existe una palabra esbelto en español que significa svelte.

Correcto.

No he/había visto la palabra esa antes..., no me parece, y quería saber si la conocían y hacían uso de ella en inglés.

Me he quedado igual.

De todas maneras gracias.
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Old June 10, 2010, 01:14 PM
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In my experience, Norton programs are usually slow and "fat", which means that when they run, they do it slowly and "monopolize" a lot of memory resources.
I think that's what they mean by "svelteness" in this context: programs that don't hinder the work of the PC.
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Old June 10, 2010, 01:39 PM
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Una palabra bien conocida; de las que vas a oír entre colegas...

Poli - Yes, easily taken as a word of such derivation, Yiddish, etc.
Derivation - from Latin and so on - "Onelook Dictionary" site has it all...

If you're into etymology along with everything else, can't be beat!
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Last edited by hermit; June 10, 2010 at 01:48 PM.
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Old June 10, 2010, 02:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
In my experience, Norton programs are usually slow and "fat", which means that when they run, they do it slowly and "monopolize" a lot of memory resources.
I think that's what they mean by "svelteness" in this context: programs that don't hinder the work of the PC.
Es bien conocido que Norton es el mejor antivirus en el sentido de que no deja capacidad de procesador para que ejecute un virus.
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Old June 10, 2010, 06:14 PM
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Es bien conocido que Norton es el mejor antivirus en el sentido de que no deja capacidad de procesador para que ejecute un virus.
...ni ningún otro programa.

Pero es cierto que ha sido mi mejor suite de seguridad en Internet. No soy muy feliz con el que uso ahora, pero es efectivo.
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Old June 11, 2010, 01:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
I when I was a kid I always thought svelte was a New -York word borrowed from Yiddish or German or Polish. I felt the same way about tumult, but it turns out that it too is proper English even though it sounds
Eastern European to me.

A propósito acabé de verificar en el diccionario que existe una palabra esbelto en español que significa svelte.
And esbeltez, too.

Here "esbelto" is a word widely known. And there is a brand called

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