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Attaching Direct Object Pronouns to Verbs

 

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Old September 07, 2009, 12:17 PM
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Attaching Direct Object Pronouns to Verbs

As far as I know, direct objects can be attached to non-conjugated verbs such as infinitives and present progressive. I'm just a bit confused with a couple of things.

If you were to say: "I want to eat it", you can either say:
Quiero comerlo.
or
Lo quiero comer.

Right??

And also AFAIK, you can do that to any direct object pronoun, is that correct?:

Quiero buscarme.
(I want to look for myself)
Quiero buscarte. (I want to look for you)
Quiero buscarla. (I want to look for her)
Quiero buscarnos. (I want to look for ourselves)
Quiero buscaros. (I want to look for you/plural)
Quiero buscarlos/buscarlas. (I want to look for them {m/f})

It's just that the ending -os sounds a little strange to me, probably because it begins with a vowel.

And is this how I would use a direct object pronoun with the present progressive?

Estoy buscandome/Me estoy buscando
(I am looking for myself)
Estoy buscandote (I am looking for you)
Estoy buscandolo/buscandola (I am looking for it/him/her etc..)
Estoy buscandonos (I am looking for ourselves)
Estoy buscandolos/buscandolas (I am looking for them)

And my main concern is:

Estoy buscandoos
(I am looking for you/plural)

This doesn't seem right? How am I supposed to say that?
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  #2  
Old September 07, 2009, 01:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twix93 View Post
As far as I know, direct objects can be attached to non-conjugated verbs such as infinitives and present progressive. I'm just a bit confused with a couple of things.

If you were to say: "I want to eat it", you can either say:
Quiero comerlo.
or
Lo quiero comer.

Right?? yes

And also AFAIK, you can do that to any direct object pronoun, is that correct?: yep

Quiero buscarme. (I want to look for myself)
Quiero buscarte. (I want to look for you)
Quiero buscarla. (I want to look for her)
Quiero buscarnos. (I want to look for ourselves)
Quiero buscaros. (I want to look for you/plural)
Quiero buscarlos/buscarlas. (I want to look for them {m/f})

It's just that the ending -os sounds a little strange to me, probably because it begins with a vowel. I did not learn it with -os, I learned it with -los. Do you use vosotros/as?

And is this how I would use a direct object pronoun with the present progressive? yes.

Estoy buscandome/Me estoy buscando (I am looking for myself)
Estoy buscandote (I am looking for you)
Estoy buscandolo/buscandola (I am looking for it/him/her etc..)
Estoy buscandonos (I am looking for ourselves)
Estoy buscandolos/buscandolas (I am looking for them)

And my main concern is:

Estoy buscandoos (I am looking for you/plural)

This doesn't seem right? How am I supposed to say that?

Help above (they might be wrong thought :P). about the -os, I thought it was supposed to be -los for you (plural) but I might be wrong

Last edited by Jessica; September 07, 2009 at 01:21 PM.
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Old September 07, 2009, 01:22 PM
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Almost entirely correct; you're just forgetting to add accents so that the stress stays where is was previously. "Estoy buscándoos" is pronounced the same as "Estoy buscando os" but without the pause between words. Most of the time, though, it would be "Os busco".

It's more usual to place the pronoun on an infinitive/present participle if you can, but if a particular combination sounds inelegant then by all means use the other form.

Edit: Sof*a, in England they teach peninsular Spanish by default. In the US I imagine it makes sense to teach either a common-denominator Latin American Spanish or focus particularly on Mexican, Puerto Rican, or Cuban Spanish (depending partly on where in the US you are).

Last edited by pjt33; September 07, 2009 at 01:24 PM.
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Old September 07, 2009, 01:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
Almost entirely correct; you're just forgetting to add accents so that the stress stays where is was previously. "Estoy buscándoos" is pronounced the same as "Estoy buscando os" but without the pause between words. Most of the time, though, it would be "Os busco".

It's more usual to place the pronoun on an infinitive/present participle if you can, but if a particular combination sounds inelegant then by all means use the other form.

Edit: Sof*a, in England they teach peninsular Spanish by default. In the US I imagine it makes sense to teach either a common-denominator Latin American Spanish or focus particularly on Mexican, Puerto Rican, or Cuban Spanish (depending partly on where in the US you are).

oh.
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Old September 07, 2009, 10:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twix93 View Post
As far as I know, direct objects can be attached to non-conjugated verbs such as infinitives and present progressive. I'm just a bit confused with a couple of things.

If you were to say: "I want to eat it", you can either say:
Quiero comerlo.
or
Lo quiero comer.

Right??

And also AFAIK, you can do that to any direct object pronoun, is that correct?:

Quiero buscarme.
(I want to look for myself)
Quiero buscarte. (I want to look for you)
Quiero buscarla. (I want to look for her)
Quiero buscarnos. (I want to look for ourselves)
Quiero buscaros. (I want to look for you/plural)
Quiero buscarlos/buscarlas. (I want to look for them {m/f})

It's just that the ending -os sounds a little strange to me, probably because it begins with a vowel.

And is this how I would use a direct object pronoun with the present progressive?

Estoy buscándome/Me estoy buscando
(I am looking for myself)
Estoy buscándote (I am looking for you)
Estoy buscándolo/buscándola (I am looking for it/him/her etc..)
Estoy buscándonos (I am looking for ourselves)
Estoy buscándolos/buscándolas (I am looking for them)

And my main concern is:

Estoy buscándoos
(I am looking for you/plural)


This doesn't seem right? How am I supposed to say that?
Es bueno , como pjt33 dijo , solo faltas los acentos

El acento deber*a poner en el tercer vocal del fin de la palabra
Buscándote
----3--2-1
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Old September 07, 2009, 10:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jchen View Post
oh.
S* jchen , en EE UU nos enseñan español que se habla en los pa*ses cerca de los Estados Unidos México/Cuba/ect. Es decir, probablemente no enseña el dialecto del España
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Old September 08, 2009, 03:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
S* jchen , en EE UU nos enseñan español que se habla en los pa*ses cerca de los Estados Unidos México/Cuba/ect. Es decir, probablemente no enseña el dialecto del España
Ejem, de dialecto, nada. El español de España es una lengua
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Old September 08, 2009, 06:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Ejem, de dialecto, nada. El español de España es una lengua
I want to learn the type of Spanish/dialect of Spanish that is spoken in Spain = Quisiera la lengua que se habla en España
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Old September 08, 2009, 07:07 AM
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But I think that the usage of "vosotros" is teach in all Spanish schools at school.
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Old September 08, 2009, 11:06 AM
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The usage of 'vosotros' is barely mentioned (hardly taught at all) in the United States (at least not in the schools I've seen). The teachers mention that it's used in Spain and skip it.

They also don't teach el voseo in the U.S.
Since this isn't used in Spain, I would suppose that the teachers only mention that it is used in some countries.
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