Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


Dar de baja/alta

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 23, 2022, 12:20 AM
Tyrn Tyrn is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 277
Native Language: Russian
Tyrn is on a distinguished road
Dar de baja/alta

Hi,

Looks like both expressions mean more or less the same. Besides, dar de alta means the opposite things at the same time, like enlist and discharge.

Also I got a vague suspicion that dar de alta is never used with inanimate objects, but my primary feeling is deep confusion
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old April 23, 2022, 06:36 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 11,131
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Enlist and discharge are antonyms in English, just as dar de baja and dar de alta can be.
I've never encountered a case when these two verbal locutions mean the same thing.

They can mean different things, according to the context, but they never mean the same thing.

Perhaps you'd like to cite some examples where you think these terms mean more or less the same thing.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old April 23, 2022, 10:26 AM
Tyrn Tyrn is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 277
Native Language: Russian
Tyrn is on a distinguished road
https://context.reverso.net/traducci...es/dar+de+alta

I hope you'll see the same sentences I do.

I suppose the useful commentary would be "dar de alta can never be this or that; dar de baja can never be ..."
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old April 23, 2022, 02:52 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 11,131
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Remember first that English verbs can have more than one meaning, depending on the context. This also happens in Spanish. The English and Spanish meanings may not coincide at all.

In a job context, 'dar de alta' means that your boss has given you a leave of absence (or has waived you from working for a time) so that you can attend to a medical need.
The staff at a hospital or doctor's office will use the exact same verbal locution when they let you return to your normal workload.
In both of these cases, you're being dismissed, but can return to what you were doing.

If you are fired from your job (also said: dismissed, let go, axed, canned, sacked, booted out, pink-slipped, etc.), that is said differently ('despedir a' or 'echar a'), because you can't return to what you were doing.

In a job context, 'dar de baja' means that your position is no longer necessary or that you were let go because there is no more work for you to do.

'Dar de alta' may mean 'register', when talking about receiving goods, or 'enter/input (add)', information-technology-wise.

'Dar de alta' could mean 'join' (a club), 'register' (make an account), or 'subscribe'. Utilities-wise, it can mean 'turn on', 'switch on', or 'activate'.

Conversely, 'dar de baja' can mean 'turn off', 'shut off', 'cut off', or 'deactivate', when talking about utilities.

It can mean 'unregister, deregister' or 'delete'.

As you can see, context is very important when trying to drum up an English equivalent.
The examples I saw on reverso are, for the most part, good translations (the third one I saw was not translated correctly).
Be careful, 'enlist' has more than one meaning in English (it doesn't always mean 'join'), so you can't just use 'dar de alta' in every case.

Last edited by Rusty; April 24, 2022 at 03:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old April 24, 2022, 02:06 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,823
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
As Rusty said, context is everything.

If you say "dar de alta" in a hospital, it means the patient can be sent home. If you use "dar de alta" in another context for example willing to be a part of a community, then it means to make that person a member.
With the examples you quoted:
- Es parte del proceso de dar de alta. -> Since there is no context here, it could mean you are annoyed having to apply or sign papers to be a part of a community, or that you can't go from hospital because the doctor didn't authorize your discharge.
- Pierce preguntó si podía dar de alta al triple A... -> No explicit context, but most likely the "guys were working on" a patient that doesn't need hospital care anymore.
- Dice que va a dar de alta la cooperación de... -> (Note: The sentence does need the article I inserted, and also I'm not sure that you can enlist someone's cooperation instead of the person themselves). Anyway, here, it's understood that we are welcoming Salim's cooperation, we're making him a formal part of the project. Same case about detective Bell.
- ...no nos obliga a dar de alta. -> It seems we're hiring new personnel, but our community is not the one for which this sentence uses "dar de alta". When a company hires new workers, they have to pay taxes for them, and we would have to set up their data in the government's lists. Yet, if it's only guards, we don't have to do that.

And as Rusty said too, "dar de baja" may have different meanings, but it's always the same idea: to remove from a list or community.
- Me di de baja de la universidad. -> I'm not attending college anymore.
- Vamos a dar de baja a este paciente -> This patient is no longer a client of the hospital. (Note it's not the same as a patient who is going home after being hospitalized, because he may still be a client there.)
- A Juan lo dieron de baja del ejército. -> Juan is no longer a soldier in the army.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
Reply

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dar de alta de un coche/ dar de baja definitiva a un coche ROBINDESBOIS Vocabulary 1 November 22, 2021 05:48 AM
Dar el alta/ el baja poli Idioms & Sayings 1 February 15, 2021 07:18 AM
Dar de alta/baja laepelba Idioms & Sayings 10 July 06, 2011 02:32 PM
Parte de alta, parte de baja ROBINDESBOIS Vocabulary 4 May 18, 2010 06:51 PM
Dar de alta poli Idioms & Sayings 4 November 23, 2008 01:05 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:30 PM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X