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Old December 22, 2009, 02:10 AM
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Mantel

This is a discussion thread for the Daily Spanish Word for December 22, 2009

mantel (masculine noun (el)) — tablecloth, placemat. Look up mantel in the dictionary

Tiraron vino tinto en el mantel blanco y no creo que se pueda sacar la mancha.
They spilled red wine on the white tablecloth and I don't think we can get the stain out.

El cura tiene mucho cuidado para no dejar caer el vino en el mantel del altar.
The priest is very careful not to spill the wine on the altar-cloth.

Mi abuela me regaló un mantel bordado en punto de cruz.
My grandmother gave me a tablecloth embroidered in cross-stitch.

Si vas a trabajar en la mesa del comedor, quita el mantel primero.
If you're going to work on the dining room table, take off the tablecloth first.

Cuando no hacemos una comida formal, usamos manteles individuales en vez de un mantel grande.
When we're not having a formal meal, we use placemats instead of a tablecloth.
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Old December 22, 2009, 01:48 PM
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El mantel del altar también se llama "corporal".
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Old December 24, 2009, 01:13 AM
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"en vez de" significa "instead of". Eso no sabía , gracias

Tengo un mantel que tiene corazones para las noches especiales
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Old December 24, 2009, 06:35 AM
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Es importante saber que mantel en inglés
y mantel en español son palabras con signifcados distintos.
En inglés un mantel es el marco de un hogar. En navidad frecuentamente
se pone velas verdes y rojas sobre el mantelpiece.

¿Cual es la palabra en español? ¿La repisa del hogar? anteoecho?
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Old December 24, 2009, 06:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Es importante saber que mantel en inglés
y mantel en español son palabras con signifcados distintos.
En inglés un mantel es el marco de un hogar. En navidad frecuentamente
se pone velas verdes y rojas sobre el mantelpiece.

¿Cual es la palabra en español? ¿La repisa del hogar? anteoecho?
Repisa de la chimenea ?
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Old December 24, 2009, 07:03 AM
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Hi everyone,

Nice word!
In Dutch 'mantel' means 'cape'. It can also mean those surrounding you. It may also be used more figuratively (de mantel der liefde, the cape/surroundings/envelopment of love).

'Mantelzorg' is the care (zorg) someone gets from those people close to him/her i.e. son/daughter/ neighbour or volunteers in the community etc instead of by official agencies or healthcare professionals.

And funnily enough we also use it wrt the chimney similar to Spanish it seems, de 'schoorsteenmantel'

I believe this word is also used in German.

http://www.vandale.nl/vandale/opzoek...ekwoord=mantel
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Old December 24, 2009, 08:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmpanadaRica View Post
I believe this word is also used in German.
I think it's used everywhere. These words derive from Latin mantele something woven by hand (from manus) hence towel, napkin, akin to mantellum, cloak, mantle. Hence to Italian mantello, French manteau, and English mantle. Also appears in Bretonic as mantell, so either this was borrowed from Latin, or the word is originally Celtic and adopted by Latin. Who knows? Who cares?
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Old December 24, 2009, 08:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmpanadaRica View Post
Hi everyone,

Nice word!
In Dutch 'mantel' means 'cape'. It can also mean those surrounding you. It may also be used more figuratively (de mantel der liefde, the cape/surroundings/envelopment of love).

'Mantelzorg' is the care (zorg) someone gets from those people close to him/her i.e. son/daughter/ neighbour or volunteers in the community etc instead of by official agencies or healthcare professionals.

And funnily enough we also use it wrt the chimney similar to Spanish it seems, de 'schoorsteenmantel'

I believe this word is also used in German.

http://www.vandale.nl/vandale/opzoek...ekwoord=mantel
Wow! Mantel in Dutch and mantel in Spanish is mantle in English. This word means cape or sheet. It's used in geography as in stone mantle over the lava. In contemporary English, it is never referred in apparel or tablecloth, but someone can wear a mantle of gloom. I think you can say : the refugee recieved assistance under the mantle of charitable organizations.
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Old December 24, 2009, 09:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
I think it's used everywhere. These words derive from Latin mantele something woven by hand (from manus) hence towel, napkin, akin to mantellum, cloak, mantle. Hence to Italian mantello, French manteau, and English mantle. Also appears in Bretonic as mantell, so either this was borrowed from Latin, or the word is originally Celtic and adopted by Latin. Who knows? Who cares?
I do..!!! well not so much wrt the exact origin but it fascinates me to see the similarities, and it being used in somany languages in similar ways both literally and figuratively.
Thanx for explaining, perikles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Wow! Mantel in Dutch and mantel in Spanish is mantle in English. This word means cape or sheet. It's used in geography as in stone mantle over the lava. In contemporary English, it is never referred in apparel or tablecloth, but someone can wear a mantle of gloom. I think you can say : the refugee recieved assistance under the mantle of charitable organizations.
Ahhh wow I never knew that!!! Thanx poli, that's great to know, so it's actually used in very much the same way, in many different ways (i.e. cape/cloak/mantle of chimney and brick/stone in geography - even in non-literal and figurative ways it's used there seem to be quite a few similarities!! ..) Very interesting indeed thanx!!!

Gracias!!
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Old December 24, 2009, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
It's used in geography as in stone mantle over the lava.
Here is a picture of a stone mantle over lava, taken during excavation for our house here in Tenerife
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