Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Vocabulary > Idioms & Sayings


"Era Para"

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 24, 2009, 11:07 AM
silopanna silopanna is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 62
silopanna is on a distinguished road
"Era Para"

People,

Can "era para" mean "was supposed to"?

For example: "Era para yo llegar a las cinco, pero el transito me retuvo."
I was supposed to get here by five o'clock, but the traffic held me up.

Or perhaps: "Habia que llegar a las cinco", or "Tenia que llegar a las cinco".

Any tips or advice?

Silopanna Dean

Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old May 24, 2009, 06:43 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,387
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
I find "era para" a bit difficult to explain, but I usually understand it's used to express there were favourable conditions for doing something, but in the end there was an obstacle.

Era para que llegara a las cinco, pero el tráfico me retuvo. (Salí temprano de casa)
I could have arrived at five, but the traffic held me up. (I left the house early)

Siempre le corrijo sus errores, ya era para que escribiera mejor.
I always correct his/her mistakes, he/she should write better by now.

Ya tienes un trabajo nuevo, era para que pudieras pagar tus deudas.
You already have a new job, you should already be able to pay your debts.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old May 25, 2009, 10:05 AM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by silopanna View Post
People,

Can "era para" mean "was supposed to"?

For example: "Era para yo llegar a las cinco, pero el transito me retuvo."
I was supposed to get here by five o'clock, but the traffic held me up.

Or perhaps: "Habia que llegar a las cinco", or "Tenia que llegar a las cinco".

Any tips or advice?

Silopanna Dean

Like Angelica said, it is a bit difficult to explain.

For me it is also like you surmise. The situation lends itself for something to happen in a certain way.

Consider:

Everything was running as scheduled but something happened along de way. So instead of you getting home at five you came late because an accident had jammed the freeway.

Era/estaba para que llegaras a las cinco (pero ese accidente te retrasó)


Same difference?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old May 25, 2009, 12:40 PM
silopanna silopanna is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 62
silopanna is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by chileno View Post
Like Angelica said, it is a bit difficult to explain.

For me it is also like you surmise. The situation lends itself for something to happen in a certain way.

Consider:

Everything was running as scheduled but something happened along de way. So instead of you getting home at five you came late because an accident had jammed the freeway.

Era/estaba para que llegaras a las cinco (pero ese accidente te retrasó)


Same difference?
Chileno,

Well, what you are describing in Spanish is basically the same as "I was supposed to arrive by five o'clock, but ..."

So I think that "era para" usually corresponds well to "supposed to".

Angelica introduced something with a slightly different flavor, she used "ya", in other words, "Ya era para". But I will commment on that in the posting which she sent.

Thanks you, you have given me some assurance and your example cemented my understanding.

Silopanna Dean
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old May 25, 2009, 12:53 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,387
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
Don't worry much about "ya" in the example, Silopanna. In this case is only used to make an emphasis.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old May 25, 2009, 12:55 PM
silopanna silopanna is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 62
silopanna is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
I find "era para" a bit difficult to explain, but I usually understand it's used to express there were favourable conditions for doing something, but in the end there was an obstacle.

Era para que llegara a las cinco, pero el tráfico me retuvo. (Salí temprano de casa)
I could have arrived at five, but the traffic held me up. (I left the house early)

Siempre le corrijo sus errores, ya era para que escribiera mejor.
I always correct his/her mistakes, he/she should write better by now.

Ya tienes un trabajo nuevo, era para que pudieras pagar tus deudas.
You already have a new job, you should already be able to pay your debts.

Angelica,

Thank you for your reply.

When you gave that sentence that had "ja era para", I think that it is the same idea as "supposed to," but we would say it differently in that case.

Siempre le corrijo sus errores, ya era para que escribiera mejor.

"I always correct your mistakes, you should be able to write better by now."

But it is like saying "...you are supposed to be able to write better by now."

I think that when you say "ya era para ...", it is like saying that things were set up for something to happen, that an arrangement was made for something to happen and that it really should have. So your comments have helped me with certain nuances.

But now let me ask you another question. About the sentence "...era para que llegaras a las cinco", which Chileno gave me as an example. Is this the same as "... habia que llegar a las cinco"? Can I say "habia que llegar a las cinco"? Is this correct?

Thanks again to you and Chileno.

Silopanna Dean

Last edited by silopanna; May 25, 2009 at 01:00 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old May 25, 2009, 01:51 PM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
In the case of "Había que llegar a las cinco" you have to use haber:

We had to arrive at five...
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old May 25, 2009, 02:11 PM
Tomisimo's Avatar
Tomisimo Tomisimo is offline
Davidísimo
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North America
Posts: 5,600
Native Language: American English
Tomisimo will become famous soon enoughTomisimo will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
...
I'd like to throw in my and offer my English translation for the following phrases that Malila posted.

Era para que llegara a las cinco, pero el tráfico me retuvo. (Salí temprano de casa)
I should have been able to get there by five, but the traffic held me up.
You would have thought I'd be able to be there by five, but the traffic held me up.

Siempre le corrijo sus errores, ya era para que escribiera mejor.
I'm always correcting his/her mistakes. I would have thought she/he would be able to write better by now.
I'm always correcting his/her mistakes. You'd (you would) have thought she/he would be able to write better by now.

Ya tienes un trabajo nuevo, era para que pudieras pagar tus deudas.
Now that you have a new job, I would have thought you would be able to pay your debts.

So, to derive some sort of pattern from this, a pretty good translation is this:

 Era para  que  +  imperfect subjuntive 
 I would have thought
You would have thought
I'd have thought
You'd have thought 
 that (optional*)  +  could have ...
would have been able to ... 

* As in many sentences, the conjunction that introduces the dependent clause in English is optional.
__________________
If you find something wrong with my Spanish, please correct it!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old May 25, 2009, 02:18 PM
CrOtALiTo's Avatar
CrOtALiTo CrOtALiTo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Mérida, Yucatán
Posts: 11,680
Native Language: I can understand Spanish and English
CrOtALiTo is on a distinguished road
I have some examples only theses ones are as practice.

This money I would that have though to pay the rent of the department.

I know that the (THAT). It's optional.
__________________
We are building the most important dare for my life and my family feature now we are installing new services in telecoms.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old May 25, 2009, 02:51 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,387
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
Thank you, David, I think that clarifies much of it.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Práctica con "para" (Part Four) laepelba Translations 37 March 15, 2009 01:19 AM
Práctica con "para" (Part Three) laepelba Translations 12 February 27, 2009 05:13 PM
Práctica con "para" (Part Two) laepelba Translations 41 February 14, 2009 07:34 AM
Práctica con "para" (Part One) laepelba Translations 15 February 06, 2009 02:48 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:30 PM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X