Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > The Tomísimo Lounge > General Chat


Una conversación con una guardián hoy!!

 

Talk about anything here, just keep it clean.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old November 07, 2009, 06:16 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
I think there is a word for tutor, in English; the same: tutor. A tutor is a teacher in charge of the problems the pupils have or somebody who helps with pupils with special difficulties; but he is not a guardian, he doesn't guard the students. I can't imagine a guardian in a school here
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #32  
Old November 07, 2009, 06:26 AM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
Yes, there is definitely a word "tutor" in English. But I've only ever heard it used for academic tutoring. The word "guardian" when used in terms of legal custody of a child really implies that this legal guardian is, according to the courts, LEGALLY responsible for the child in place of a parent. Because SO many kids are not necessarily in the custody of their actual parents, in the schools, the language on most forms/letters, etc. is "parent or guardian". So I would send a letter home with my students that starts with "To the parent or guardian of So-and-So-kid".....
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old November 07, 2009, 06:36 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Yes, there is definitely a word "tutor" in English. But I've only ever heard it used for academic tutoring. The word "guardian" when used in terms of legal custody of a child really implies that this legal guardian is, according to the courts, LEGALLY responsible for the child in place of a parent. Because SO many kids are not necessarily in the custody of their actual parents, in the schools, the language on most forms/letters, etc. is "parent or guardian". So I would send a letter home with my students that starts with "To the parent or guardian of So-and-So-kid".....
OK, you mean that the child lives with his/her tutor, as if he/she was his/her parent. Yes, it's the same word here: tutor (tutor legal)
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old November 07, 2009, 02:23 PM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
Well, no - not in English. Tutor is ONLY for academic help. In English you would only use "guardian" for legal custodian. So your sentence would be "...the child lives with his/her guardian, as if he/she were his/her parent." Sorry I'm being confusing.
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old November 08, 2009, 12:35 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Well, no - not in English. Tutor is ONLY for academic help. In English you would only use "guardian" for legal custodian. So your sentence would be "...the child lives with his/her guardian, as if he/she were his/her parent." Sorry I'm being confusing.
Yes, sorry, I wrote it in English and I was thinking in Spanish. I wanted to say that "el niño vive con su tutor" (the child lives with his guardian). It was my fault.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old November 08, 2009, 04:23 AM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Yes, sorry, I wrote it in English and I was thinking in Spanish. I wanted to say that "el niño vive con su tutor" (the child lives with his guardian). It was my fault.
Ahhh! Exactly - that is correct in English. Thanks for explaining!
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old November 08, 2009, 04:42 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Ahhh! Exactly - that is correct in English. Thanks for explaining!
No, you explained it to me. Gracias a ti
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old November 08, 2009, 08:08 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 9,062
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
By the way... The school-jargon around here, since most children live with their parents (at least with one of them), is simply "mamá" or "papá".

Hoy hablé con una mamá sobre las calificaciones de su hijo.
Today I talked to a mother about her son's grades.

Más tarde tengo que recibir a un papá que tiene una queja sobre un maestro.
Later I have to see a father who has a complain about one of the teachers.

Juan, quiero que les des este recado a tus papás.
Juan, I want you to give this message to your parents.

I used "mother" and "father" instead of "mom" and "dad", because for this purposes, "mamá" and "papá" are used in a formal context.
"Papás" in plural is the equivalent of "mom" and "dad" for "parents".
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...

Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; November 08, 2009 at 09:33 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old November 08, 2009, 09:15 PM
Cloudgazer's Avatar
Cloudgazer Cloudgazer is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 539
Native Language: American English
Cloudgazer is on a distinguished road
Me alegré al leer de tu conversación exitosa completamente en español, Lou Ann; ¡felicidades! ¡Tengo celos de ti!

Y gracias por el enlace al sitio de ejercicios para competencia en español en la universidad de Texas. Es muy bueno.
__________________
―¡Qué divertido y desafiante es el español, ¿verdad, Teal'c?!
En efecto.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old November 09, 2009, 12:48 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
En España "mamá" y "papá" son palabras muy familiares y no se usan en contextos formales (ni habituales, por lo general):

Hoy tengo una reunión con los padres de mis alumnos.
Dile a tu padre/madre/ que venga a verme.

A mi amiga del alma:

¿Cómo están tus padres?

A mis hermanos:

¿Cómo están papá y mamá?

A un niño o niña muy pequeños:

¿Dónde está tu mamá/papá?

A un niño o niña a partir de, más o menos, 6 ó 7 años:

¿Dónde está tu madre/padre?

La verdad es que he visto este uso que tenéis de las palabras "papá" y "mamá", tan familiares para mí, en otros hilos y no deja de sorprenderme.

Reply With Quote
Reply

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cuenta con una experiencia Tomísimo MainePotsAndPans Introductions 10 March 03, 2009 01:22 PM
Propongan frases con errores típicos para hacer una subasta. Planet hopper Grammar 5 February 11, 2009 05:35 PM
Ellos compraban una casa chica con jardín y fondo cmon Translations 13 December 15, 2008 09:14 PM
una pregunta con respecto a la linguística gramatica Grammar 4 March 04, 2008 10:48 PM
una palabra con H, I, O, X ó N, S, Z gramatica Grammar 8 February 17, 2008 09:10 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:59 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X