#1  
Old November 09, 2010, 05:10 AM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
Question Ladrillo

I know that it is English for "brick", but a different dictionary says "heavy (familiar)" and RAE says "Cosa pesada o aburrida". Will you please comment on this? How can something familiar be heavy? And in the RAE definition, is this an adjecgtive?
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old November 09, 2010, 05:15 AM
sosia's Avatar
sosia sosia is offline
Ankh-Morpork's citizen
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: a 55 cm del monitor
Posts: 2,984
Native Language: Spanish (Spain)
sosia has a spectacular aura aboutsosia has a spectacular aura about
familiar implies "a familiar usage"
A brick (Un ladrillo) in a familiar usage, it's something heavy you have to carry, literally or not.
examples
cosa pesada y aburrida (familiar):
-El discurso de Obama/Fidel Castro/Chávez fue un ladrillo
The lecture of Obama/Fidel Castro/Chávez was long and tedious
heavy (familiar)
-mi nuevo móvil es muy ligero, el anterior era un ladrillo
My new mobile phone it's feathery, the old was big and heavy

You can say both in a familiar way, but it's not a proper word to write.
saludos
__________________
History, contrary to popular theories, "is" kings and dates and battles.
Small Gods Terry Pratchett

Last edited by sosia; November 09, 2010 at 08:11 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old November 09, 2010, 05:52 AM
Perikles's Avatar
Perikles Perikles is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tenerife
Posts: 4,814
Native Language: Inglés
Perikles is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
I know that it is English for "brick", but a different dictionary says "heavy (familiar)" and RAE says "Cosa pesada o aburrida". Will you please comment on this? How can something familiar be heavy? And in the RAE definition, is this an adjecgtive?
GDO:

ladrillomasculino
1 brick;
una pared de ladrillo a brick wall; fachada a ladrillo visto or (América Latina) de ladrillo a la vista brick facade; ser un ladrillo (familiar) «libro» to be heavy-going; «persona» (Argentina) to be dense o slow (familiar)
In BrE there is also the concept of being very stupid: to be as thick as a brick
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old November 09, 2010, 06:33 AM
aleCcowaN's Avatar
aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 3,127
Native Language: Castellano
aleCcowaN is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
ladrillomasculino
...
«persona»
(Argentina) to be dense o slow (familiar)
This doesn't exist here at all.

plomo, plomazo = dull boring person, boring performance, tedious time, long waiting time
piedra, tonelada = something heavy
piedra = something indigestible ---> "me cayó como piedra"

"Ladrillo" is not used here with those meanings -I can't recall any lexical use of it in that sense outside Spain-
__________________
[gone]
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old November 09, 2010, 07:46 AM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,300
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
I agree with Sosia's explanation and examples. We can also use "un plomo" instead of "un ladrillo".

@Lou Ann: No, it's not an adjective, but a noun used as some sort of metaphor.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old November 09, 2010, 10:33 AM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
I know that it is English for "brick", but a different dictionary says "heavy (familiar)" and RAE says "Cosa pesada o aburrida". Will you please comment on this? How can something familiar be heavy? And in the RAE definition, is this an adjecgtive?
In English (I guess it is a false cognate)

you're a brick!

We use it instead to mean "dense"
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old November 09, 2010, 01:15 PM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by sosia View Post
familiar implies "a familiar usage"
Does "familiar" then mean "informal"? I'm not really clear on the "familiar" part....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
GDO:

ladrillomasculino
1 brick;
una pared de ladrillo a brick wall; fachada a ladrillo visto or (América Latina) de ladrillo a la vista brick facade; ser un ladrillo (familiar) «libro» to be heavy-going; «persona» (Argentina) to be dense o slow (familiar)
In BrE there is also the concept of being very stupid: to be as thick as a brick
What is this GDO? Is there a website? Or are you re-typing stuff from a book that you have?

Quote:
Originally Posted by chileno View Post
In English (I guess it is a false cognate)

you're a brick!

We use it instead to mean "dense"
I've never heard that phrase used in English before. Maybe it's Nevada-English?

Thanks, all - I think I've got it now.
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old November 09, 2010, 01:28 PM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,431
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
Your a brick sounds truly strange to me, however if you say you are thick as a brick, you are accusing someone of being stupid.
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old November 09, 2010, 01:30 PM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Your a brick sounds truly strange to me, however if you say you are thick as a brick, you are accusing someone of being stupid.
That doesn't sound as odd to me....
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old November 09, 2010, 02:11 PM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Does "familiar" then mean "informal"? I'm not really clear on the "familiar" part....
Yes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
I've never heard that phrase used in English before. Maybe it's Nevada-English?
Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Your a brick sounds truly strange to me, however if you say you are thick as a brick, you are accusing someone of being stupid.

Either will mean "stupid".

"What, Am I talking to a brick?"

Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
That doesn't sound as odd to me....
Well, it must be because "your a brick" is totally different from "you're a brick"
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

Tags
brick, dense, ladrillo, tabique

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ladrillo DailyWord Daily Spanish Word 38 August 11, 2009 08:07 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:32 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X