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Diferencia entre huésped e invitado

 

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  #1  
Old January 26, 2009, 08:54 PM
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Diferencia entre huésped e invitado

What is the difference in usage between the words "huesped" and "invitado"?

¿Cuál es la diferencia en uso entre "huesped" y "invitado"?

¡Muchas gracias por su respuesta en inglés!
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  #2  
Old January 26, 2009, 11:02 PM
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Huésped is usually used when you're staying at a hotel, or wherever you're paying to stay the night.
If you've been invited to another person's home, you're the guest (invitado) - they're the host (anfitrión). The same words are used when you invite persons to your home. You're the anfitrion, they're the invitados.
All this being said, it is possible to hear huésped used when you're talking about guests in your home that are staying the night or over a period of time.
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Old January 27, 2009, 12:55 AM
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Yes, Rusty's answer are accurate, only I want add more information above this thread even though, I said the same, when you have invited someone then is named guess, then when a person is a hotel is boarder.
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Old January 27, 2009, 02:54 AM
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Quote:
invitado, da. (Del participio de invitar).
1. m. y f. Persona que ha recibido invitación.
So it's simply a person who has received a invitation. Can it be a dinner, a party, a weekend, ...

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huésped, da. (Del lat. hospes, -ĭtis).

1. m. y f. Persona alojada en casa ajena.
2. m. y f. Persona alojada en un establecimiento de hostelería.
3. com. Biol. Vegetal o animal en cuyo cuerpo se aloja un parásito.
4. m. y f. p. us. Mesonero o amo de posada.
5. com. p. us. Persona que hospeda en su casa a otra.

"Huésped" is a person who does not sleep in his/her home.
An older use it's the person who invites others to stay at his house, or an innkeeper. The normal word is "anfitrión", wich is the person who take care of the "invitado" or "huésped".

So "huésped" and "invitado" can be used as the same word only if the invitation is "for staying at others house".
Example:
"Les presento a mi invitado el sr Jordin"
"Les presento a mi huésped el sr Jordin"
"Invitado" is a little more polite, usually the "huésped" pay money. It depends on the context if he is really paying or it's an "invitado".

Saludos
PD modismo "ser alguien huésped en su casa" Parar poco tiempo en casa propia.
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Old January 27, 2009, 03:49 AM
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Thanks to all for the very thorough answer to my question! As always, the gang here at tomísimo.org is more than helpful! I can't tell you how much your input is directly responsible for the improvements in my Spanish!
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Old January 27, 2009, 08:46 AM
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Lou Ann, perhaps it would be good to mention that the word y changes to e if the word that follows it begins with i or hi.
¿Cuál es la diferencia entre huésped e invitado?
padres e hijos
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Old January 27, 2009, 02:39 PM
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Oooh! Rusty - I think I learned that about 20 years ago when I attempted to take Spanish (extremely unsuccessfully in college) - thank you for that final reminder!
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Old January 27, 2009, 02:41 PM
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You're welcome.
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Old February 03, 2009, 11:19 AM
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In metropolitan Spain a visitor is un visitante or just una visita.
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Old February 03, 2009, 02:36 PM
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I think that the answer, you have said as Visitor is like than guess, but I don't know, there are different kind of words similar for the same mean, then, as I said before, I know above the mean of the word Visitante and Huesped as guess and boarder Mexico on. If you know above other kind of word for the give the same result in this investigation please, you let us know.
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