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Old October 09, 2013, 01:39 AM
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Extensa

How can we say extensa for a language.
Context:
You perfect one language you have to work hard a language is very wide?
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  #2  
Old October 09, 2013, 02:03 AM
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For extenso you can use extensive or wide for a vocabulary

Spanish has an extensive vocabulary
He travelled around Spain for years and gained an extensive vocabulary
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Old October 09, 2013, 05:41 PM
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and in the sense of ample, a language is very big, very ............ I don´t find the word
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Old October 09, 2013, 06:55 PM
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¿Cómo es la frase en español?

amplio (= completo)

Si hablas de "un estudio, un tratado" sería: extensive

Si son "conocimientos, vocabulario" diríamos "extensive, wide"...

English is a language with a very wide range of nuances...

My Spanish vocabulary is wider than my Catalonian one...
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Old October 09, 2013, 07:05 PM
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We use 'extensive', not wide, when referring to vocabulary. 'Large' is also used.
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Old October 09, 2013, 08:50 PM
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Is "wide" not used much for this sense?

Or is it simply "less" used?

I find a wide range of examples of usage of "wide vocabulary" in the net...

Like this one...

In short, a wide vocabulary is fundamental to master the language.

http://www.theenglishvocabulary.com/index.php

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Old October 09, 2013, 09:15 PM
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I would never say that.

The site you linked to also reads "Do you have problems to express your ideas in English?"
Using a full infinitive after "have problems" sounds extremely strange to me. I would use the gerund, expressing, instead.

Do you have problems expressing your ideas in English?
In short, a large vocabulary ...
In short, an extensive vocabulary ...

You'll find many more hits on the internet (which we hear is not a good meter) using 'large vocabulary', 'extensive vocabulary' and 'problems expressing your ideas'. In fact, almost all hits on 'problems to express your ideas' come from the same author.

Perhaps this is regional usage, but the site you linked to is precisely the region where I lived for 12 years and I know I never heard anyone use these odd locutions.
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Old October 09, 2013, 10:23 PM
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Wow!

Thank you, Rusty.

Is it, perhaps, a British usage?
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Old October 09, 2013, 10:26 PM
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We can wait for our English cousins to awaken.
Any other American English speakers can chime in, too. Some of us are still awake.
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Old October 09, 2013, 10:31 PM
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Ok, thanks, Rusty.
What's your take on this?
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...3151154AAGNLRp

(One of the answerers clearly goes for "extensive"... while the others don't even mention the point...)
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