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Old October 17, 2008, 10:37 AM
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Spanish lesson

To say "Spanish lesson" in Spanish, would I say "lección de espanol," "lección espanol", or none of the above?

Thanks
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Old October 17, 2008, 10:41 AM
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la/una lección de español
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Old October 17, 2008, 11:16 AM
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Remember the tilde, when you're writing the ñ, like in español.

If you're unable to type it on your keyboard, use the little dropdownbox just above the text-field. It contains the character along with other Spanish characters.
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Old October 17, 2008, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElDanés View Post
Remember the tilde, when you're writing the ñ, like in español.

If you're unable to type it on your keyboard, use the little dropdownbox just above the text-field. It contains the character along with other Spanish characters.
Thanks, but what does the "tilde" do or mean?
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Old October 17, 2008, 11:40 AM
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English speakers refer to the squiggley line above the letter ñ as a tilde. There is a letter n and a letter ñ is Spanish. Each has a distinct sound and should never be confused.

The n is pronounced much like the English n. The ñ is pronounced like the ny in canyon.

Last edited by Rusty; October 17, 2008 at 11:43 AM.
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Old October 18, 2008, 03:57 AM
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In Spanish we don't call the wavy thingie above the ñ anything, not that I know, for us it's just there

The tilde is the stroke over stressed syllables, doesn't exist in English. Whole set of rules as to when you must put it on or not. English keyboards not ready for that either

You can use alt+a number if your computer has a keyboard without ñ.

A spanish lesson is 'una clase de español'

Una leccion de español sounds more academic, more like a university thing.

Cheers
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Old October 18, 2008, 04:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Planet hopper
In Spanish we don't call the wavy thingie above the ñ anything, not that I know, for us it's just there
According to Wikipedia it's also called tilde in Spanish, or virgulilla.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Planet hopper
English keyboards not ready for that either
On a normal US keyboard you can change the settings to make it US-International. In that way you can combine the keys. In order to type the ñ on the US-International keyboard, you first press the key on the left side of the number-1 key (the one with ~ and ` on it) and then the character-n key.
I believe you can do the same on British and Irish keyboards as well, but the ~ is placed on the left side of the Enter-key (the one with ~ and #). Maybe you will have to use the AltGr-key as well. Hold AltGr, press ~/#, release AltGr and press n.

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Old October 18, 2008, 04:34 AM
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Dunno a lot about wikipedia, virgulilla sounds better to me than tilde, the ñ thingie and the tilde are different in shape. It is not very academic to assume that they are the same.

What I'm saying is that spanish speakers don't look at ñ as an alternative to n, an ñ is not an n with sth on top, at least I'm saying this as a philology graduate.

For us, ñ is a completely different letter, the thingie and the letter are regarded as a unit, as a whole.

Keyboards have always been troublesome with spanish for me, clumsy moi
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Old November 03, 2008, 02:13 AM
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From RAE
Quote:
tilde.(De tildar).
1. amb. Virgulilla o rasgo que se pone sobre algunas abreviaturas, el que lleva la ñ, y cualquier otro signo que sirva para distinguir una letra de otra o denotar su acentuación. U. m. en f.
2. amb. p. us. Tacha, nota denigrativa.
3. f. Cosa mínima.
Eldanés is right, is called tilde or virgulilla.
Agree with Planet Hopper:
Quote:
For us, ñ is a completely different letter, the thingie and the letter are regarded as a unit, as a whole.
has his own key in keyboard, in dictionaries, and so on. For us, It's like thinking "h" is not a different letter, because it has no sound
saludos
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